Category Archives: Classical Training and Philosophy

Deadlines, bottomlines, stress … and letting go!

“There is no joy in deadline. The desire to be something is ego-oriented and useless to the horse. Strive to do something instead! Do not seek arrival but enjoy the process of getting there.” Charles De Kunffy, The Ethics and … Continue reading

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Is your instructor worthy?

One reason I dropped out of teaching and training was the epidemic of anyone who won a few ribbons hanging out their shingle as a trainer.  In some cases, people who rode horses trained by other people were getting their … Continue reading

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Apprenticeship

In this era of learning everything by YouTube video or Facebook posts, people seem to rarely have the patience to spend time learning anything in depth.  I have read many an article that says we no longer need experts because … Continue reading

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Nothing educates like a horse

Buried in annual staff evaluations, filing our taxes, and starting up a blog for my mother, I am resigned that the draft posts I started will have to wait.  However, in quiet moments, when my brain needs a break, I … Continue reading

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Principle above technique

If there is one thing that can stir horse people up, it’s a discussion on technique.  I don’t care what discipline you are in, as soon as you start to discuss technique or method, opinions are strong, and dismissals frequent.  … Continue reading

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The divergent paths of art and sport

I write often about the parallels I see between art and classical Dressage.  It was a sensibility that began to take root while I was studying art, but was truly entrenched during my years of training Dani.  As we grew … Continue reading

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